Safe Family and Friends

When flooding occurs, all people are not impacted in the same way. This makes it even more important to ensure the safety of all. Whether it is financial hardship, inequitable disaster aid from FEMA, difficulty navigating the support systems available, or a variety of other barriers and stressors, there is great variance in the experiences of those affected by disaster. Regardless of experience, people are at the forefront of any disaster.

In order to strengthen our communities and continue to cultivate safe and inclusive spaces for all members of our jurisdictions we must consider who is at risk of being impacted by flooding, what actions increase flood risk for vulnerable populations, and how these people might be affected by any flood events that occur.

In the “Safe Family and Friends" section of Flood Ready, we provide you with a brief introduction to environmental justice, as well as ask thought-provoking questions to support you as you consider how to plan in a way that maintains healthy communities.
 

Links to the sections below:

Basic Concepts

Learn what environmental justice and social vulnerability are and begin to think about how these concepts might be relevant in your community.

Guiding Questions

Consider how your community can plan in a way that addresses the needs of all community members.

Key Takeaways

View a brief outline of key takeaways from this section and consider how they are applicable to your work in your community.

Resources

Access resources related to creating more equitable communities, including a variety of social vulnerability and environmental justice mapping tools, as well as a brief collection of podcasts, articles, and more that are available to enhance your existing knowledge of environmental justice and equitable floodplain management.
 

Burt May's House in Bolton Vermont during the 1927 flood.

Burt May's House in Bolton during the 1927 flood.
Silver Special Collections Library, University of Vermont

 

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